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#Id Name Image Description Geolocation Address City State
93782 Waldo-Hancock Bridge The Waldo–Hancock Bridge was the first long-span suspension bridge erected in Maine, as well as the first permanent bridge across the Penobscot River below Bangor. The name comes from connecting Waldo and Hancock counties. The bridge was retired in 2006, when the new Penobscot Narrows Bridge was opened just a few yards away, and it was demolished in 2013. 44.5602780,-68.8022220
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93783 Klir Beck House The Klir Beck House, also known as The Gnomes, was a historic house in Vienna, Maine. It was an architecturally idiosyncratic house, built by the artist Klir Beck as a summer residence. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, and was destroyed by fire in 2000. It was delisted in 2017. 44.5072220,-70.0013890
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93784 Brick House Historic District The Perkins Homestead, also known as the Brick House, is a historic homestead at 478 River Road in Newcastle, Maine. The 57-acre (23 ha) property, including its 1837 brick farmhouse, was designated a National Historic Landmark for its association with the life of Frances Perkins (1880–1965), the first woman to hold a position in the United States Cabinet. Perkins spent many years, both as a child and later as an adult, at this property, which she considered to be her true home. The property was first listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009 as the Brick House Historic District in part for its archaeological significance. 44.0052000,-69.5575000
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93785 Col. Isaac G. Reed House The Col. Isaac G. Reed House, also known historically as Cutting's Folly, was a historic house at 60 Glidden Street in Waldoboro, Maine. Built in 1807, it was a sophisticated local example of Federal period architecture, with an unusual period bow-shaped room. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. It was destroyed by fire on April 2, 2017, and was subsequently removed from the register. 44.0969440,-69.3772220
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93786 Walter and Eva Burgess Farm The Walter and Eva Burgess Farm was a historic farm at 257 Shaw Road in the rural southwestern part of Dover-Foxcroft, Maine known as Macomber Corner. The main farmstead, including a house and barn, were built in 1914 after the 19th-century farmstead was destroyed by fire. The property represented a virtually intact and well-preserved early 20th-century farmstead of rural Maine, and was stylistically distinctive because not very much new farm construction took place at that time in the state. The farm was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. This farmstead, including the historic house and barn, was destroyed by fire in 2013. It was removed from the National Register in 2015. 45.1105560,-69.2277780
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93787 Timber Point Timber Point is a historic summer estate in Biddeford, Maine. Located at the city's southernmost tip, and now part of the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, the property was developed in the 1930s by architect Charles Ewing for his family. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. 43.3988400,-70.3975840
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93788 Gerrish Warehouse The Gerrish Warehouse was a historic 18th-century warehouse, located on Pepperrell Cove in Kittery Point, Maine. Built c. 1710, it was one element of the Pepperrell family's shipping empire, notably run in the mid-18th century by Sir William Pepperrell. Converted into a ship chandlery in the 19th century, it was sold to the Maine Maritime Museum in 1976, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The museum's plan to move the building by barge to a new location was judged infeasible, and it was subsequently demolished after the museum had recovered its contents. It was removed from the National Register in 2015. 43.0811110,-70.7183330
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93789 Queen City Hotel The Queen City Hotel was constructed in 1871 by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) in Cumberland, Maryland to serve both as a train station and as a destination. Hosting 174 rooms, it also had such features as formal gardens with a fountain, a ballroom and 400-seat dining room. It was torn down in 1972 to make room for a new main United States Post Office and Distribution facility with a much smaller station for Amtrak service between the new Post Office and the railroad tracks. 39.6501440,-78.7574210
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93790 Hughes A.M.E. Chapel Hughes A.M.E. Chapel, also known as the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church and the Nause-Waiwash Longhouse, is a historic building located near Cambridge in Dorchester County, Maryland, United States. It is a simple rectangular frame structure, three-bays in length, with a medium-pitched gable roof. The exterior is covered with weatherboard siding and the windows are covered with shutters. The former church building is a common example of late 19th and early 20th century religious buildings that were built in rural communities on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. It was located in the Bucktown area, which was home to bi- and tri-racial people who were descended from Native, African, and European Americans. The building has been occupied throughout its existence including ancestors of the Nause-Waiwash Band of Indians, who acquired the building in 1998. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2018. 38.4503000,-76.0716000
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93791 Cockey-Jamison-Hendrickson House and Store The Cockey-Jamison-Hendrickson House and Store are historic buildings located in Urbana, Frederick County, Maryland, United States. The house and store were built by Sebastian Cockey, a scion of an old Maryland family. The house, c. 1850 with a 20th-century addition, is an example of vernacular domestic architecture of the period in this region. The 2½-story late Federal style structure follows an L-shaped plan, and features a three-bay facade, gabled roof, and a hip roofed porch. The adjacent store was rebuilt in 1927 to its present appearance. It is a typical rural commercial building for its time period. Originally known as "S. G. Cockey's Cash Store," it sold dry goods, hardware, farm supplies, and Esso gasoline until 1958. 39.3260000,-77.3490000
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93792 Mason and Dixon West Line Milestone Markers 76 and 77 The Mason and Dixon West Line Milestone Markers 76 and 77 are historic objects located in Frederick County, Maryland and Adams County, Pennsylvania, United States, near the community of Harney, Maryland. They are two of the original milestones that mark the Mason-Dixon line between the states of Maryland and Pennsylvania.Oolite limestone was quarried and carved on the Isle of Portland in the English Channel. Both were part of the third shipment of milestones and they arrived in Baltimore in June 1767. Stones from this shipment were placed in 1767 to mark mile 64 and miles 66 through 132 on the West Line. Both of these sites were surveyed on October 24, 1765. Milestone 76 was set on October 13, 1767. Milestone 77 was set the following day 125 yards (114 m) to the east of its true location, which is in the middle of Marsh Creek. It is one of two milestones intentionally offset due to the challenges of its true location. 39.7200000,-77.2208330
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93793 Rosenstock Village Site The Rosenstock Village Site is a historic site located in Frederick County, Maryland, United States, near the city of Frederick. It contains the remains of a Late Woodland Village situated on a bluff overlooking the Monocacy River. The village was occupied between between A.D. 1335 and A.D. 1400, based on artifact analysis and radiocarbon dating. It is similar to the Montgomery Complex, which is a cultural complex made up of Late Woodland sites located on the Potomac River. The site was excavated in 1979 and from 1990 to 1992, and estimates suggest that 93% of the site remains undisturbed. They uncovered a large oval area surrounded by pits, a large sheet midden area, and what are believed to be two sweatlodges. The excavations have yielded a trove of artifacts and animal remains. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2018.
93794 Forest View (Howard County, Maryland) Forest View is a historic building located near Marriottsville, Howard County, Maryland, United States. The farm on which this house was built was a speculative venture that was begun 1860-1861, which was rare for that time period. In time production at the farm ended and the property was subdivided. Unlike many Howard County farms that suffered the same fate, the house was preserved. It is a 2½-story frame structure with a kitchen wing that extends out the back of the house. The original block was built in 1861, and addtions have subsequently been added to the house including a second story over the kitchen wing. The Gothic Revival decorative features were added in the late 19th or early 20th century. The house's final form was realized about 1936. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2017. 39.3205330,-76.8984650
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93795 Bethesda Meeting House The Bethesda Meeting House (BMH) is a historic Presbyterian church complex located at Bethesda, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA. Its name became the namesake of the entire surrounding community in the 1870s. It is situated on Maryland Route 355 (known as Rockville Pike at this point) just inside the Capital Beltway. 39.0097220,-77.0983330
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93796 St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish Historic District St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish Historic District is a national historic district located at Croom, Prince George's County, Maryland. The district encompasses four contributing buildings and three contributing sites associated with St. Thomas' Church. The other contributing buildings are the Gothic Revival style St. Thomas' Church Rectory (1852-1853), Tenant/Sexton's House (c. 1890), and tobacco barn (c. 1905). The contributing sites are the St. Thomas' Episcopal Church Cemetery, St. Simon's Mission Chapel Site, and St. Simon's Cemetery. The African-American communicants of St. Thomas' Church formed St. Simon's Mission Chapel in the late-19th century and it operated on the property associated with the Croome Industrial and Agricultural School (Croom Settlement School), which operated from about 1902 to 1952. 38.7474690,-76.7581030
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93797 Resurrection Manor Resurrection Manor was a historic home located near Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland, United States. It was built amidst a 4,000-acre (16 km2) farm granted to Thomas Cornwaleys in 1650. It was an example of early brick architecture in the United States dating from about 1660 to 1720. It was originally built as a one-room house with a steep stair leading to the garrett. A 1½-story addition was added to the house, transforming its footprint into a hall-and-parlor configuration. 38.3380560,-76.5094440
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93798 Col. Charles Codman Estate The Col. Charles Codman Estate is a historic house on Bluff Point Drive in Barnstable, Massachusetts. Built in 1870, the house is a well-preserved example of a summer seaside resort house in Queen Anne/Shingle style. It was designed by Boston architect John Sturgis, and modified in the early 20th century, adding some Colonial Revival elements. The estate was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in March 1987, and it was included in the Cotuit Historic District in November 1987. 41.6113890,-70.4327780
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93799 Barnstable Fair Hall The Barnstable Fair Hall was an exhibition hall located in Barnstable, Massachusetts that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was damaged by fire and demolished sometime after its listing in 1979.
93800 Ruth and Robert Hatch Jr. House The Ruth and Robert Hatch Jr. House is a historic house at 309 Bound Brook Way in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. It is one of a modest number of surviving houses in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. This single story wood frame house was built in 1961 on Bound Brook Island to a design by local architect Jack Hall. Extremely rustic in appearance, its exterior is sheathed in vertical boards and its windows have working shutters but no glass, resulting in a sharply vertical appearance. The structure consists of three rectangular sections of different sizes that are based on modular 7' by 7' squares; the main public living space is 35' by 49', the master bedroom is 7' by 21', and the guest bedrooms are in a block that is 7' by 14' (enlarged from the original 7' by 7' in 1978). The house, which is within the bounds of the Cape Cod National Seashore, was sold by the Hatches to the National Park Service, but retain occupancy rights. 41.9559690,-70.0746430
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93801 Peter Kugel House The Peter Kugel House, also known as the Kugel-Gips House, is a historic house at 188 Way 626,Wellfleet, Massachusetts, in Cape Cod National Seashore. It is one of a modest number of surviving houses in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. This house was built in 1970 to a design by architect Charlie Zehnder, who took his design inspiration for it from the Fallingwater estate designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. 41.9443210,-69.9980330
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93802 Samuel and Minette Kuhn House The Samuel and Minette Kuhn House is a historic house in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. It is one of a modest number of surviving houses in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. The single-story wood-frame house was built in 1960 to a design by Nathaniel Saltonstall, founder of Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art. The Kuhns were exposed to Saltonstall's work when they stayed at The Colony, another property he designed that is located nearby on Griffins Island. The house incorporates Bauhaus design principles of simplicity and economy, and is based around the idea of square modules, which are repeated on small, medium and large scales, affecting the room shapes and sizes, windows, and interior furnishings and decorations. The house, which is within the bounds of the Cape Cod National Seashore, was sold by the Kuhns to the National Park Service in 1973, but they retained right of occupancy for 25 years. The Park Service began using the property for employee housing in 2003. 41.9457440,-70.0682830
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93803 Anthony and Allison Sirna Studio The Anthony and Allison Sirna Studio is a historic artist's studio at 60 Way #4 in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. It is one of a modest number of surviving buildings in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. The studio was built in 1960 to a design by Victor Civkin; it has a trapezoidal plan with nine large vertical window bays. The building is within the bounds of the Cape Cod National Seashore, and is owned by the National Park Service. 41.9580450,-69.9939700
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93804 Vera and Laszlo Tisza House The Vera and Laszlo Tisza House is a historic house at 2 Deer Trail (a cul-de-sac off Gross Hill Road) in the remote northeastern part of Wellfleet, Massachusetts, within the Cape Cod National Seashore. It is one of a number of surviving houses in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. The house was designed by Olav Hammarstrom, a protégé of Eero Saarinen, for Vera and László Tisza. The house is a T-shaped one-story structure with a central breezeway that provides views of the surrounding woodlands to much of the house. The main block, which is divided by the breezeway, measures 41 by 25 feet, with a 31 by 14 foot section added perpendicular to its north end. A flat roof, covered with rolled asphalt, extends for two feet beyond the edges of the house, and has exposed rafters that are visible both inside and outside the house. There is a recessed porch on the south side of the main block. 41.9600740,-69.9986420
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93805 Paul and Madeleine Weidlinger House The Paul and Madeleine Weidlinger House, also known simply as the Weidlinger House, is a historic house at 54 Valley Road in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. It is one of a modest number of surviving houses in Wellfleet that combine elements of Modern architecture with traditional Cape Cod architecture. The single story wood frame house was built in 1954 by designer Paul Weidlinger (founder of Weidlinger Associates, a design firm) for his family's use. It is located on a steep grade overlooking Higgins Pond, with one end projecting over the grade. A deck wraps around three sides of the house, and large glass doors give views of the surrounding landscape. The house, which is within the bounds of the Cape Cod National Seashore, was donated to the National Park Service in 1973 by Madeleine Weidlinger. The house is the subject of a 2012 lease agreement between the Park Service and the Cape Cod Modern House Trust. 41.9600130,-70.0066280
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93806 Dodgeville Mill The Dodgeville Mill is a historic mill complex at 453 South Main Street in Attleboro, Massachusetts. With industrial history dating to 1809, it is one of the city's oldest industrial sites. The complex now consists of an accretion of frame and brick buildings, constructed over the 19th and early 20th centuries. Textile production, which included manufacture of Fruit of the Loom branded products, ended at the site in 1970s. 41.9213000,-71.2966000
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93807 Lowney Chocolate Factory The Lowney Chocolate Factory is a historic industrial complex at 150 Oakland Street in Mansfield, Massachusetts. Developed beginning in 1903, the complex was used until 2010 by a variety of primarily corporate owners for the manufacture and processing of chocolate products, most recently Archer Daniels Midland. The complex, vacant in 2016, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016 as an important local employer, and a good local example of Late Victorian industrial architecture. 42.0395650,-71.2145120
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93808 Russell Garrison The Russell Garrison was a fortified area of Dartmouth, Massachusetts in the 17th century. Now a small town-owned public park located on Fort Street in its Apponagansett neighborhood, the garrison site includes the reconstructed foundational remnants of the homestead of early settler John Russell, progenitor of the locally prominent Russell family. The house was originally surrouned by a wooden stockade, and was the site of attacks during King Philip's War in the 1670s. It is one of the town's few 17th-century home sites whose location is known, having undergone excavation in 1951. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2018. 41.5978000,-70.9570000
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93809 Hampden County Training School The Hampden County Training School was a reformatory school for boys at 702 South Westfield Street in Agawam, Massachusetts. Established in 1916, it operated until 1972, providing training agriculture and vocational skills to its charges. In 1978 its Classical Revival campus was converted for use as a police training academy. In 2010, the state sold the property to a veterans support organization for conversion to residences. The facility opened in 2017. 42.0443000,-72.6724000
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93810 John and Ruth Rose House The John and Ruth Rose House is a historic house at 944 Main Road in Granville, Massachusetts. It was built about 1742 by John Rose, one of the first colonial settlers of the area, and is a good example of rural Georgian architecture. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2018. 42.0729000,-72.9008000
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93811 Westfield Municipal Building Westfield Municipal Building is a historic building at 59 Court Street in Westfield, Massachusetts. It presently houses the Westfield city offices and the local district court. It was built in 1889 to house the state normal school (now Westfield State University), serving in that role until its acquisition by the city in 1959. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Hartwell and Richardson. The second partner was William Cummings Richardson, not H. H. Richardson, but the design of this building, only a few years after the latter's death, was strongly influenced by his distinctive style. 42.1200500,-72.7504000
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